Category: dementia

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What are the 12 Activities of Daily Living?

Activities of daily living can be divided into twelve categories, five of which fall under ADLs, and seven are instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs).  The categories of activities of daily living are: Personal hygiene – bathing and grooming Feeding…
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When You Should Provide ADL Care to Persons with Dementia?

Dementia involves a group of symptoms that progressively and irreversibly damage a person’s cognitive functions, language, and behavior. The early signs of dementia often develop gradually, so they can go unnoticed for a long time.  The first symptoms of dementia…
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Why Do People With Dementia Need Help with ADLs

Your loved one with dementia may need help with self-care and other routine activities for many reasons. They may not understand why some things need to be done, they may not understand how to perform these activities, or they may…
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How to Help the Person with ADLs?

Persons with dementia may not understand instructions on how to do something, not recognize objects or know how to handle them, or get frustrated when they struggle with something. It is, therefore, important to stay calm and supportive while you…
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What are the 5 ADLs?

The 5 ADLs involve basic self-care routines that we perform every day. These involve: Personal hygiene – bathing, washing hands, washing hair, grooming, oral, and nail care Feeding – the ability to feed oneself Dressing – the ability to choose…
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What is the Difference Between ADL and IADL?

IADL stands for instrumental activities of daily living. These routine day-to-day activities are somewhat more complex than ADLs but also affect the person’s ability to live and age independently.  Seven IADLs are: Transportation and shopping – how much the person…
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Activities of Daily Living (The ADL’s)

Activities of daily living, also known as ADLs, involve routine self-care activities we normally perform independently. However, people with chronic illnesses, injuries, or debilitating health conditions such as dementia often need everyday assistance with basic tasks and activities of daily…
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dealing with dementia in older people
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Dealing With Dementia

Dementia is not a specific disease but a group of symptoms that involve a decline in one’s cognitive functioning, behavior, and social skills. Dementia typically involves forgetfulness and memory loss along with a decline in language skills and communication, the…
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dementia patients wandering
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Why Do Dementia Patients Wander?

Wandering is one of the greatest concerns for dementia patients’ families and caregivers. Research shows that six in ten people with dementia wander. People with dementia wander because they get easily disoriented, even in familiar places, and don’t remember their…
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Why Do Dementia Patients Stop Talking?

Dementia destroys brain cells, causing the person to lose the ability to speak and to understand speech (aphasia). The person typically has difficulties remembering the right words and processing what others are saying. This condition worsens as dementia progresses. In…
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Devoted Guardians'
Response to COVID-19

Devoted Guardians is actively monitoring the progression of the coronavirus, COVID-19, to ensure that we have the most accurate and latest information on the threat of the virus. As you know, this situation continues to develop rapidly as new cases are identified in our communities and our protocols will be adjusted as needed.

While most cases of COVID-19 are mild, causing only fever and cough, a very small percentage of cases become severe and may progress particularly in the elderly and people with underlying medical conditions. Because this is the primary population that Devoted Guardians serves, we understand your concerns and want to share with you how our organization is responding to the threat of COVID-19.

We are following updates and procedures from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) State Department of Health, local and county authorities, the Home Care Association of America and other agencies and resources. Our response and plans may adjust according to the recommendations from these organizations.