, ,

Does Dementia Kill You?

2Comments
Does Dementia Kill You

Does Dementia Kill You?

Dementia is defined as fatal brain failure which leads to death. Many people think of dementia as a memory disorder associated with old age. That is true, specifically in the early stages, but it goes much further than that. As the disease progresses it leads to complete brain failure, resulting in death. It is not simply a mental ailment as many people often perceive it as.

The stages of dementia can vary between people and the different types of dementia but it is considered a slow-progressing disease. Many patients with dementia will live for several years, sometimes even longer than a decade, after first being diagnosed. The progression of the disease may be slow but, unfortunately, there is no cure and the disease will lead to death in the final stages.

How Does Dementia Kill You?

Dementia is an umbrella term that covers many progressive brain diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and vascular dementia, among others. Patients of these diseases often exhibit different symptoms in the early stages of the specific disease they were diagnosed with but during the late stages, most symptoms are the same.

It’s a common misconception that dementia itself doesn’t kill the patient but rather major health events while suffering from dementia are the cause. While it’s not uncommon for major health issues to be associated with dementia, the majority of patients die from the disease itself. That is why many experts recommend palliative care for patients in the end-stage of dementia. Rather than utilizing aggressive treatments for health problems caused by dementia, which cause additional distress and discomfort while rarely extending lifespan, they recommend keeping the patient comfortable and improving quality of life.

Get Dementia Care from the Top Home Care Providers in Phoenix, AZ

Do you have a family member or loved one suffering from dementia? Call (480) 999-3012 and talk to one of our staff at Devoted Guardians. We are one of Arizona’s largest home care providers with personnel trained in dementia care. We offer daily 24-hour living assistance, including nighttime watch, and personal care.

Pinterest
LinkedIn

2 Comments

Avatar
Richie loadenthalMay 22, 2020 at 8:57 amReply

I was in a severe car accident about 15 years ago. My balance an memory is getting worse. I am a little paranoid because my wife is blind. I am now ‘69. I read eventually you die. I feel healthy. I work out always. How long will I still can live with out care.

Aaron Sinykin
Aaron SinykinMay 25, 2020 at 7:55 amReply

We tried to write a guide here that helps people understand how dementia works. And another one here that talks about reversing Alzheimer’s. There are 7 stages of dementia, and the stages “can be” years apart from each other. Stage 4-5 is usually the time you might want to consider low-level living assistance for things like traveling alone or managing your finances.

https://devotedguardians.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Previous Post

What Are The Signs Of End Stage Dementia?

Next Post

What Do People With Dementia Die From?

Devoted Guardians'
Response to COVID-19

Devoted Guardians is actively monitoring the progression of the coronavirus, COVID-19, to ensure that we have the most accurate and latest information on the threat of the virus. As you know, this situation continues to develop rapidly as new cases are identified in our communities and our protocols will be adjusted as needed.

While most cases of COVID-19 are mild, causing only fever and cough, a very small percentage of cases become severe and may progress particularly in the elderly and people with underlying medical conditions. Because this is the primary population that Devoted Guardians serves, we understand your concerns and want to share with you how our organization is responding to the threat of COVID-19.

We are following updates and procedures from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) State Department of Health, local and county authorities, the Home Care Association of America and other agencies and resources. Our response and plans may adjust according to the recommendations from these organizations.